Subcontract (Part 2)

By Bob Davidson

Performed by John Scougall , Lucy Goldie and Barry Robertson


Continuing our last podcast today we have released part two of our interview with the cast of Subcontract. Read below for our transcript for you to read of the podcast and dont forget to enter our competition to win some amazing Subcontract goodies!

About The Play:


An award-winning play, set in the present in the small office of a joiner's workshop in the Scottish Highlands. Dougie and Jessie's business is going under until one day they receive a mysteries phone call from the Government. Scared that it is the inland revenue when Mr Cooper appears he questions the couple to sign the secrecy act to work in secrecy on building a nuclear submarine made completely out of MDF to save the government millions of pounds without the public knowing.


You can purchase the audio drama today for as little as £1.99

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Audible

iTunes


The Podcast:

The Cast:

From Left to Right:

John Scougall, Lucy Goldie, Barry Robertson and playwright Bob Davidson


Facebook Competition:


Win a paperback copy and audiobook of Subcontract including five runner up prizes by entering our Facebook competition below. (answer is available via our podcast)

Bob Davidson's Insights:

Listen Exclusively on Spotify


Transcript of Podcast:


Barry Robertson Part 2:


Hello, and welcome to Barry Robertson's insights podcast, in today's podcast. We continue our conversations, with the cast and creative team of Bob Davidson's 'subcontract' brought to you by the Grey Hill.


Excerpt of Play:


Here, maybe I could make flat pack self assembly moose heids? Forget the moose hieds, Dougie. The moose heid idea is a bummer. It's deid in the water... I like yer prototype, it's fine, ye can pit it up in the bathroom, if ye can mind how tae dae it, I can hing ma dressing gown on it, but as a far as a runaway commercial success jist waiting tae happen, it's a no, no... And besides, it's flat a'ready...two dimensional. Cartoonesque... Now if we were tae set up a facility in China, churn them oot at tuppence a throw and still sell them fur a fiver... Aye, we'd make about twenty quid... You're right, naebody wants an MDF moose heid. I was bored... I ken how ye feel. If a varnish ma nails ony mair I'll no' get ma gloves on. But what can ye dae? Folk are no' needin' moose heids. They're no' needin' anything.


Barry Robertson:


That was a short excerpt of subcontract, which is brought to you by the grey hill, which is available internationally on iTunes, audible, and Amazon. We continue our conversation with actors, John Scougall, and Lucy Goldie, John Lucy that's play reminds me of a ruraltouring performance, like a borderline theatre performance or an old wildcat performance. It's not really, Glaswegian like something that you would find say at the citz or the tron, but it could play anywhere in Scotland, and audiences would . Enjoy it. Do you know what I mean?


Lucy Goldie:


Absolutely. Yeah. Yeah. I think people would turn up in these rural locations and, and it would be a real night of entertainment and

John Scougall:


Equally I think, you know, people would turn up to the citz or Tron, it would be a nice entertainment there as well, you know, its very universal in terms of its appeal. I think.


Barry Robertson:


What do you think of the play, do you think there should be a sequel to it?


Lucy Goldie:


I would love it. Yeah. I would love to read more about about these characters and yeah, I think that, I don't know. I somehow imagined it as maybe a two-part or even a three part piece. I don't know if it would be like almost little vignettes, like little days in the life of these characters or where it might go as John was saying about something like slab boys, you, you start to see more of a, maybe a wee insight into the characters and what makes them do what they do. And, and is there an element, you know, is there more scope to, to maybe play up with the, you know, a bit sadness of how they've come to be this way? I mean, obviously it's really funny the way it's written, but you know, there's potential, isn't there to go monologue, I don't know, there's, there's so many options I think with it, but the characters are so lovely. I really would like to see more of them.


John Scougall:


Yeah, I agree. And, and I, you know, the kind of medium that you use, I mean, obviously it works on audio. I think It would work in theatre very well it would translate to that very well. But I also think, you know, some sort of screen adaptation or like a two, three, four part, half an hour, it's kind of almost like a sitcom , but, not quite like a sitcom might be interesting as well to see, it's a fun little story, but I think, I think it could be adapted most definitely to the screen. I think,


Barry Robertson:


The Great thing about this play as the characters like, you just know what ever happens to them, you know, that they're going to make it work, right?


Lucy Goldie:


Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I think that's, that's the thing, it's some of their behaviour in this short piece that we we've read is it's really interesting. You just think, how did they get to that point? How did they meet with the sections to meet the minute they don't answer that phone. I'm thinking, what is this about? You know? And it, it takes quite a long time of, of maybe two people, alone in the one house. I mean, we're all.


John and Lucy:


I think we can, I think we can all relate.


Lucy Goldie:


To that with this year, all the lockdown scenarios, but I think it's that thing of, of two people who they can behave in quite strange ways, but because they've only really got each other to bounce off. It all goes a little bit haywire. Doesn't it as it is a wee bit odd. And I think that's, what's so fascinating. And what really draws you in, into it as well is you're kind of wondering what are the up to? And how do they get by?, And is this the way that the function on an everyday basis?


Barry Robertson:


Do you think, Jessie and Dougie the characters that you play, change when Mr. Cooper, who I play comes into the performance?


Lucy Goldie:


That's why I had so much fun playing with when he comes in. It is that way were, someone could be like having an absolute meltdown, the phone rings, and, and they've got that phone voice on, it's got that feel to it, of just flicking the switch. So I think when your character comes in for like, from my point of view for, for Jessie, I think she's just so keen to impress. And she knows that he's an official and the minute she starts to get sense of this deal, that could be had. What's interesting, is I suppose, the Jessie we see at the start, is kind of the reality, the ground down, you know, she, she just disappears with Dougie, but the minute she's kind of sees the dollar signs, it's interesting to see the flip in her. And it was really funny to play that,


John Scougall:


But there is a definite shift in and, and the relationship and, and the, the kind of what, what the story is, what story is about and where it's going. And I think that's a Testament to the way you played it as well. I thought he did it beautifully, but also I think that it's, you know, it's just a really, it's that whole thing of, of two people they've got there life, they've got their own ways. And then Chuck in another situation similar to, you know, Lucy and I are obviously together in a relationship were married. And I think when you, when you Chuck in a, a pandemic or yit just changes the dynamic and you can just situation were still married I'd like to say.


Lucy Goldie:


With some interesting conversation. (laughs)


Barry Robertson:


Yeah. If I the pandemic didn't ruin our relationship nor the play (laughs), I thought it was, it was great. I thought what you did with it was fantastic as well.


Barry Robertson:


Thank you mate. A lot of people will know this, but actually you two are in the Grey Hill's first audio book because during the pandemic I was faced with the option to, do I start this business as a brand new company, after years of working in theatre, or do I play X-Box for a week and can see what happens this pandemic may, you know, eh, get out of here. And after a week I was getting bored and,uI decided, you know what, I'm gonna do this, let's do this and create this company. And what people wouldn't know about this play being the one and now we are in number nine. So there's been a lot of them and hopefully you will have seen the progression because you, have been in another ones is that, I literally, as a small boutique company, I start up em had 10,000 applicants and I had to listen to 10,000 cause there's nobody else in the company. It's just me so I had to sit there and listen to everyone's interviews and auditions and don't take this the wrong way actors, but maybe this is a really good note. If you can't do a Scottish accent and somebody asks you to do a Scottish accent, then don't bother auditioning because I had to let people from Wales and people from Northern Ireland, people from England saying yes I can do a Scottish accent. And the truth is when I heard both of your auditions. And I think this is where the husband and wife thing comes in because I was looking for something unique, something that said that these two were an item yous two fitted in brilliantly. And when I heard you, so I was like, thank you, God. Oh my God, this is amazing. I'm so excited to work with these guys are, it was just an amazing thing for me personally. So what's nice about this podcast and talking to, you now is this to me will be the one that I always look back on and say. This is the first one, the one that started the ball rolling really?


Lucy Goldie:


Oh, that's lovely, for me it felt very exciting too. Read a script like this. Do you know, we weren't far into lockdown. There was a sense of this kind of void in front of you. An impending doom about creativity. What, what are we doing? You know, everything's closed. We can't have audiences together. And I think to reach such a gorgeous script, is this the chance to work with John? And we have worked together quite a lot over the years, it kind of, it reminded me a little bit of a piece we did at theatre 503 together, the writing is quite different, but equally it was, it was quite comedic. , It was lovely having that, rhythm and that rapport back and forward between us and I really enjoyed bringing that to you, and it was lovely. It's been really lovely that the two of us are here and lock down and we jest, but it's so wonderful. Well, not only to have that support, but also to, to be able to work together and be creative together.


John Scougall:


To be able to keep working. I mean, you know, I think we need to think very, very grateful that throughout the kind of lockdown period, we have continued to work and doing what we love. And I know that there's so many, so many, many other people out there that haven't had that opportunity and feeling worried it might not come back again for a while. So I think, you know, it's when, when opportunities come up and, and Lucy, I've been really lucky that will have had, you know, a number of opportunities, not only with yourself, which you've been very kind, but with, with other people as well. So it's, you know, it's been a, it's been a joy to be able to spend so much time together during lock down then, but also to, to keep doing what we love and to have people like yourself who keep finding new innovative ways to keep the work coming in,


Barry Robertson:


How was the rehearsal period for subcontract, for you, living in a nationwide, you know, COVID pandemic lockdown from home. How was this experience for you both?


Lucy Goldie:


Well, it was lovely because I think the more you read it and when you can actually look someone in the eye and you're delivering those lines back and forward, I think you can create a really, really nice rhythm, and also try out lots of different things as well with it. And yeah, just, just see how, see how it changes with every read, see how, what you find with it. And, and we do, we know each other so well, obviously that as we, we do have that report and we really enjoy, I really enjoy working with you. We really enjoy working together.


John Scougall:


Yeah, no, and it's nice. It's nice that you, you get the opportunity to work with your best friend you know what, I mean, it's, it's very privileged to be able to do that. Um and in terms of the fact that we obviously are in the same, eh, the same house and during lock down we were in the same house constantly meant that we did have the opportunity to chat about different things and to play about. Um but more than that, I think being able to bounce off each other, actually, if you're doing it because the rehearsals are one thing, but it's always more fun when you can, you know, for reals and you're bouncing off each other. And I think that was the that was the, that's a good thing about walking with Lucy is not only is she, you know, incredible actor, but she's also, I know also well, so I can the way, she says things that can affect me and vice versa. Use I think that was for, for me. So it was one of the joys of working with her.


Lucy Goldie:


Thank you so much. We did, we did a really nice energy going in this booth. Didn't we, it was really fun to do


Barry Robertson:


John, Lucy. Thank you so much for spending time with me in this podcast today and filling us in and telling our listeners about the production. If you are interested in the production, it's available online via audible, Amazon and iTunes, with more information at the Grey Hill website, so it's thegreyhell.com/Subcontract. And now it's over to Bob Davison, the playwright of subcontract.


Excerpt of Play:

I like that... Is it for sale? It is, Mr Cooper... Eh, it's ten pounds. Ten pounds, really, is that all? I think I'll have to have it... I've got a bit of a shed... At the bottom of the garden. My man cave, my wife calls it. I like to sit there with a beer and a good book sometimes. This'll look super up on the wall... You're awfully clever, Dougie... And so much nicer than a real one, doesn't ask any questions... Ten pounds you say? There you go. I'll see myself out. Cheerio... Cheerio, Mr Cooper...


Barry Robertson:


I hope you enjoyed that excerpt of 'subcontract written by Bob Davison performed by Barry Robertson, John Scougall and Lucy Goldie. I'm here with the author himself. The playwright Bob Davison. Bob, tell me, where did you get an idea for subcontract?


Bob Davidson:


I got the idea for a subcontract at a time when there was, there was a lot of talk on the radio about decisions have to be made about the renewal of trident two or something. And the ease with which the UK government seemed to be able to lay their hands on a hundred billion, quid to pay for it, or however much it is. And I thought they should just fake it and just pretend. And from, and from that idea, making dummy submarines out of cardboard and pretend missiles or something would be a far better idea. I think all countries should do it actually be a lot safer and cheaper. There was a huge panic recently about a big parade in North Korea when observers spotted these massive or a massive Misael on a, on a, on a big lorry. In fact, I think we even counted the wheels on the lorry, but I just thought, well, it could all be plywood or paper mashie or CGI. I mean, that's all you need do it. Just sort of, kind of computer generate some big fancy stuff and everybody would be happy and it'd be cheaper. And we'd all be a lot safer in our beds.


Barry Robertson:


There's something charming about Jessie and Dougie. Explain them in a nutshell, Bob, because I could honestly listen to those two all day.


Bob Davidson:

I like Dougie and Jessie, I think they're they're happy and content and living in a bygone age all to themselves we age when things were simpler there idea of high tech is using the print machine in their the local railway station to do some business counts and I like that.


Barry Robertson:


Tell us about their business. It seems on the rocks at the moment?


Bob Davidson:

Running a small businesses, never easy especially, now, a days, I would think, folk don't want a shelf put up. They want a new kitchen from Ikea or wherever. I just wanted to give Dougie and Jesse a break.


Barry Robertson:


No. What about the moose heads? Do they ever become a bestseller?


Bob Davidson:


Well, the moose head is only there because I had one in my garbage that I made for a production of faulty towers, but I played Manuel with Burnham Institute players. So it was laying around. So I thought, well, I could just incorporate that into play. Cause I had a notion that Burnham Institute players would actually perform it. So, so that's where the moose head came from. And to answer your question, no, they're not exactly selling in the millions,


Barry Robertson:


I Have to say Bob that, eh, Cooper character as a lovely guy, he explained the Nicola pen (laughs)


Bob Davidson:

Hes an interesting guy. I like Cooper is a sir Humphrey gone rogue. and I like to be flips back and forth between being amazed at the technical achievement of nuclear weapons, but to being disgusted at that impact and, and probably most of all the waste of government money that they are. I'm still not sure if he's acting officially or off his own back the Nicola Penn was just a wee, not so subtle reference to being pro Scottish independence.


Barry Robertson:


Where did the idea come from? The MDF submarine?


Bob Davidson:


Well, MDF is a great material it's cheap and cheerful and just the job for a mock-up somebody that doesn't have to last very long.


Barry Robertson:


Now What is the future of Jessie and Dougie?


Bob Davidson:


I think Dougie and Jessie will live quietly on their money. Maybe get into the swing of those foreign holidays that Jessie fancies so much. I can just see them wandering around Rome with Dougie still dressed and he's dungarees and sports jacket and bonnet.


Barry Robertson:


Thank you for listening to our podcast with the cast and creatives of subcontract written by Bob Davison, starring John McDougall, Lucy Goldie and Barry Robertson. Join us again for the next Barry Robertson's Insights where we'll be talking exclusively to Bob Davison and finding out his five favourite songs and more intimate questions. Thank you for listening to this podcast, be sure to subscribe anywhere that you listen to your podcast today and share with friends and family.


Subcontract is available worldwide where you can purchase the audio drama today for as little as £1.99

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